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Reed R. Heustis, Jr.
 You're here » Christian Columns Index » Reed R. Heustis, Jr. » Yoko Ono Knows No Peace
Yoko Ono Knows No Peace
by Reed R. Heustis, Jr.
November 1, 2007
Category: Christian Living
RECENTLY I OVERHEARD an acquaintance, who happened to be a pop music enthusiast, assert that there was not a person alive who disliked The Beatles.

"Reed, do you like The Beatles?" he tried to confirm.

"Absolutely not," I replied, becoming the first.

He nearly fell off his chair.

On October 9, 2007, Yoko Ono, widow to the late John Lennon of Beatles fame, unveiled her Imagine Peace Tower in Reykjavik, Iceland, dedicating the light tower to Lennon and to his concept of "peace." Inscribed on the tower in 24 different languages is the clause, "Imagine Peace."

According to Ono's website at imaginepeace.com, "[t]he work is in the form of a wishing well from which a very strong and tall tower of light emerges." Like a brilliant laser, the light blasts vertically upward toward the heavens and beyond.

While it is tragic that a psychotic killer took Lennon's life in a senseless act of violence in 1980, it is likewise truly sad that billions of people worldwide continue to imbibe on Lennon's anti-Christ religion of peace.

Without a doubt, the Imagine Peace Tower is rooted in Lennon's sentiment memorialized in his song, Imagine, a tune which remains today one of the world's most popular. The problem though, is that Imagine is nothing more than an anthem for worldwide Pluralism. Every verse of Lennon's ballad calls for a worldview that exalts itself against the Kingship of Jesus Christ.

In the first verse, Lennon presupposes that heaven and hell are figments of man's imagination:

Imagine there's no Heaven
It's easy if you try
No hell below us
Above us only sky

Contrary to this presupposition, the Bible lays out the existence of heaven and hell clearly, and the Second London Baptist Confession of Faith sums it up nicely:

The bodies of men after death return to dust, and see corruption; but their souls, which neither die nor sleep, having an immortal subsistence, immediately return to God who gave them. The souls of the righteous being then made perfect in holiness, are received into paradise, where they are with Christ, and behold the face of God in light and glory, waiting for the full redemption of their bodies; and the souls of the wicked are cast into hell; where they remain in torment and utter darkness, reserved to the judgment of the great day; besides these two places, for souls separated from their bodies, the Scripture acknowledgeth none. (emphasis added)

In the second verse, Lennon advocated a globalist utopia without the existence of nations:

Imagine there's no countries
It isn't hard to do
Nothing to kill or die for
And no religion too
Imagine all the people
Living life in peace

Lennon's vision more closely resembles that of Karl Marx, author of The Communist Manifesto. Before Lennon was ever a twinkle in anyone's eye, Marx imagined exactly what Lennon later suggested, namely that religion (specifically Christianity) was the "opiate of the masses" and that the "workers of the world" will be united in a form of one-world and borderless wonderland.

Marx's atheistic vision was adopted by the Soviet Union, which would soon become one of the world's most brutal and murderous regimes in the history of human civilization.

Contrary to Ono and her late husband, nationhood is a blessing from God and the basic building block of a stable world order. Contrarily, erasing nations necessitates weaponry such as the United Nations institution that is specifically intended to usher in a borderless world without countries. The problem with that, of course, is that the founders of the United Nations - those who "imagine no countries" - were nothing but communist conspirators who drafted a Charter that closely resembles the Constitution of the former Soviet Union.

Deceived by her anti-Christian worldview, Ono showcases on her website a quote from Lennon that attempted to redefine, and ultimately blasphemed, the One True God of Holy Scripture:

We're all god.
I'm not A god or THE god, but we're all god and we're all potentially divine and potentially evil.
We all have everything within us.
There is a power we can all tap.
God is a power and we're all light bulbs that can tap the electricity.
You can use electricity to kill people or to light the room.
God is that.
I don't need to go to church.
I think people who need a church should go.
The others who know the church is in your own head should visit that temple 'cus that's where the source is.
- John Lennon, 1969

Balderdash. Another lie from the pit of hell. There exists only one God, creator of heaven and earth, by whom Lennon's destiny will be adjudicated on Judgement Day. As the LBC states:

The Lord our God is but one only living and true God; whose subsistence is in and of Himself, infinite in being and perfection; whose essence cannot be comprehended by any but Himself; a most pure spirit, invisible, without body, parts, or passions, who only hath immortality, dwelling in the light which no man can approach unto; who is immutable, immense, eternal, incomprehensible, almighty, every way infinite, most holy, most wise, most free, most absolute; working all things according to the counsel of His own immutable and most righteous will, for His own glory; most loving, gracious, merciful, long-suffering, abundant in goodness and truth, forgiving iniquity, transgression, and sin; the rewarder of them that diligently seek Him, and withal most just and terrible in His judgments, hating all sin, and who will by no means clear the guilty.

It is not religion that is the opiate of the masses, as Marx suggested, but rather Lennon's poisonous redefinition of "peace" and his idolatrous concept of "god" - concepts that Ono continues to peddle today.

Most people on earth desire peace. Unfortunately however, those who refuse to acknowledge the One True God, ultimately reject the Prince of Peace Himself, the Lord Jesus Christ. They refuse to recognize that the sin of man is the ultimate cause of all pain and suffering in the world. As the American Heritage Party Digest of Principles declares, "Sin (rebellion against God) is responsible for man's fall from grace and the corruption in the world and ultimately of nature itself. Man, existing in a fallen and sinful state, is in need of salvation and government."

Ono rejects, and Lennon abhorred, this Biblical truth.

Satan, the adversary of Christ, is extremely subtle and deceptive. Masses of humanity worldwide are enchanted by the "light" of Satan, who once had been Lucifer, an angel of light. Satan could care less if people worship him or not. Instead, Satan cares more about people worshipping anybody or anything other than Christ Himself. A defeated foe who knows that unbearable eternal punishment awaits, Satan seeks to drag as many souls into the abyss as he possibly can. Therefore, he often disguises his diabolical schemes by wrapping them in perfectly enticing decor, such as Lennon's concept of "peace."

Thus it is ironic, but not at all surprising, that the Imagine Peace Tower is nothing more than a deceptive bright, radiant beam of luminescence that mocks God as it bursts into the heavens. The Angel of Light must be grinning ear to ear.

Instead of vainly imagining a utopian concept of "peace" that is impossible to achieve absent the return of Christ, people must repent of their sins and embrace the Prince of Peace.

No Jesus, no peace. Know Jesus, know peace.

Reed R. Heustis, Jr., Esq. is a Southern California native, and publisher of Christian Constitutionalist. A member of the State Bar of California, Reed earned his Juris Doctor from California Western School of Law in San Diego, and his Bachelor of Arts in Political Science from University of California at Irvine. Reed and his family are members of a local church affiliated with the Association of Reformed Baptist Churches of America.

More columns by Reed R. Heustis, Jr.

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